Tråd: VIZ publishes Kazuo Umezu's manga "Cat Eyed boy"

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/518FTszfLOL._SS500_.jpg

Cat Eyed Boy, Vol. 1 (Paperback)
by Kazuo Umezu (Illustrator)

Editorial Reviews
From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. An earlier work from the creator of The Drifting Classroom, this 1967 series is an anthology of horror short stories by the man known as the master of horror manga. The cat-eyed boy narrates some tales as be observes them; in some he's a direct participant. The third and most interesting tale, The Tsunami Summoners recounts the events surrounding the cat-eyed boy's birth. The first two puzzling chiller tales feature monster men as well as men who become monsters, but the stories lack any moral message, which might place the book as comeuppance theater. No one gets revenge or learns a lesson, and the monsters' inner lives are just as evil as their outward grotesque appearances. The cat-eyed boy casts no moral judgment on the people who pelt him with rocks even as he tries to save a town from tsunami-summoning monsters. Umezu excels at drawing cute but totally shocked school boys and the grotesque monsters that scare them, but his art is hypnotic in its juxtaposition of the two. Two giant volumes of the series are being released on the same date—a date that fans of classic Japanese horror should have circled in big letters. (Reviewed from a partial galley.) (June)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Product Description
Cat-Eyed Boy is a half-human, half-monster child who mostly resembles a human, and therefore cannot live in the demon world. He lives hidden in the shadows of the human world, hated by both demons and humans. But wherever he goes, awful events occur. Humans interact with demons, but for the most part the humans that appear to act more evil than the monsters. Cat-Eyed Boy acts like Trickster, saving the innocent and helping the wicked receive the punishment that fate metes out. The stories are mostly tales of revenge and retribution for the evil acts people do. The series is broken into 11 individual stories, full of extremely grotesque and disturbing images.

Product Details
Paperback: 544 pages
Publisher: VIZ Media LLC (June 10, 2008)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1421517922
ISBN-13: 978-1421517926

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51NerLiNJVL._SS500_.jpg

Cat Eyed Boy , Vol. 2 (Paperback)
by Kazuo Umezu (Illustrator)

Editorial Reviews
Product Description
Cat-Eyed Boy is a half-human, half-monster child who mostly resembles a human, and therefore cannot live in the demon world. He lives hidden in the shadows of the human world, hated by both demons and humans. But wherever he goes, awful events occur. Humans interact with demons, but for the most part the humans that appear to act more evil than the monsters. Cat-Eyed Boy acts like Trickster, saving the innocent and helping the wicked receive the punishment that fate metes out. The stories are mostly tales of revenge and retribution for the evil acts people do. The series is broken into 11 individual stories, full of extremely grotesque and disturbing images.

About the Author
Kazuo Umezu, who started drawing professionally in the 1950s, is considered the most influential horror manga artist ever. His many horror and sci-fi/horror works include Nekome Kozo (The Cat-Eyed Kid, 1967-1968), Orochi, The Drifting Classroom (1972-1974), Ultraman (a manga adaptation of the TV series), Senrei (Baptism), My Name is Shingo, The Left Hand of God/Right Hand of the Devil, and Fourteen. His popular gag series Makoto-Chan (1976) and Again prove that Umezu is also an accomplished humor cartoonist. (He is also a musician.) Umezu's weird style, incredible ideas and sometimes terrifying imagery have made him a fixture of Japanese pop culture, and his work has been adapted into movies, anime and collectibles. His homepage is "http://www.umezz.com/"

Product Details
Paperback: 496 pages
Publisher: VIZ Media LLC (June 24, 2008)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1421517914
ISBN-13: 978-1421517919

from http://comics212.net/2008/03/23/cat-eye … h-america/

a short e-mail interview with Alvin Lu, Vice President, Publishing, VIZ Media:

Christopher Butcher, Comics212.net: What led to VIZ Media considering the publication of Kazuo Umezu’s CAT-EYED BOY? Particularly in a format so completely different than other Viz Media releases… How do you expect readers to react?

Alvin Lu, Vice President, Publishing, Viz Media: VIZ Media is currently in the process of a long-held dream: gradually revealing to an English-reading audience a cross-section of the totality of the works of one of the 20th century's greatest artists (all categories), Kazuo Umezu. Having completed our run of the long serial, the work many consider to be Umezu's masterpiece, THE DRIFTING CLASSROOM, we are now embarking on releasing a representative earlier work, CAT EYED BOY, which we intend to publish, in swifter fashion, in its entirety. In the case of each of our Umezu releases, we consider the ideal format to feature that work. In such a long and varied career, a one size fits all approach is not necessarily appropriate.

This is a case where we would like the publisher's motives and angles, and speculation over market reception, to be less the subject of chatter than simply the work itself. The work will speak for itself. Our role in the cases of these publications, which over time will be (and have already been) regarded as cornerstone works in the history of manga, is to feature the work to its best advantage.

Comics212: The trend in 2006-2007 was to collect older manga material in “omnibus” volumes. Did the relative sales successes of these omnibus editions affect your decision on the format for CAT-EYED BOY?

Alvin: The decision to publish CAT EYED BOY in this format was made around the time we decided to the same for TEKKONKINKREET. At the time, we had no real idea if the format would be viable in the marketplace or not, although it seemed to us that this would be ideal format to feature this work.

Comics212: The covers for the Japanese and English editions of CAT EYED BOY are very different, though the latter does incorporate elements of the former. Can you detail some of your decision-making regarding designing the English-edition covers? Do bookstore buyers influence your designs?

Alvin: VIZ Media wanted to create something exciting and strange, something that would make the book an object that wouldn't be out of place within the manga itself. We do solicit and respect feedback from buyers, but over broader strategies. I can't think of a case of soliciting feedback regarding a specific cover.

Comics212: Does Kazuo Umezu have any input into the English language editions of his work?

Alvin: When we first started discussions about publishing Umezu's work there was more back and forth and yes, sometimes there is very specific requests on the proposed cover.

Comics212: Will the VIZ media editions of CAT-EYED BOY include any extras, along the lines of the “TEKKONKINKREET” release? Ie: original covers, posters, interviews, creator profiles, etc.

Alvin: Not on the same scale. As I said, the idea was to make the book as much an object as the contents of the book itself. The manga images themselves carry this out far more effectively than any other information… though there is an interview at the end of the second book.

Comics212: Finally, why should everyone pick up CAT-EYED BOY when both books are released June 17th?

Alvin: Because it is strange and beautiful.

It’s pretty clear that the content is a heck of a lot more important to Mr. Lu than the packaging, and in general I understand, though the art, design, and aesthetics of manga have become more and more a factor into my appreciation of the work. I think that the covers for the forthcoming English-language editions of CAT-EYED BOY are actually quite nice, fitting nicely into the design ideology for classic manga material defined by Vertical Publishing on their reprints of works by Osamu Tezuka, and Keiko Takemiya.

To be completely honest I was sold on CAT-EYED BOY before I saw any cover art at all. Umezu’s Drifting Classroom has been so consistently engaging and enjoyable over the past year that I can’t imagine not picking up everything released into English by this creator for as long as I’m buying comics. I think that the weight and heft given to this series by it’s massive binding and one-day release schedule will draw the right kind of attention to this work and continue to establish Umezu as a name worth knowing for North American comics readers.

- Christopher

"When the desert comes, people will be sad; just as Cannery Row was sad when all the pilchards were caught and canned and eaten." - John Steinbeck

Sv: VIZ publishes Kazuo Umezu's manga "Cat Eyed boy"

Kul att det släpps mer klassisk och udda manga än bara den mainstream-moe som varit vanligast hittills. Möjligen kan ju J- och K-horror-vågen ha spelat in.

Ethno-postmodernism in an Albert Speer pattern dominates.

Sv: VIZ publishes Kazuo Umezu's manga "Cat Eyed boy"

Wakuran skrev:

Kul att det släpps mer klassisk och udda manga än bara den mainstream-moe som varit vanligast hittills. Möjligen kan ju J- och K-horror-vågen ha spelat in.

Det har nok gjort det muligt for den mere ukonventionelle j-horror manga på engelsk - af Junji Ito, Kazuo Umezu, og Hideshi Hino.

"When the desert comes, people will be sad; just as Cannery Row was sad when all the pilchards were caught and canned and eaten." - John Steinbeck